An ICIJ Investigation Collateral Damage

U.S. hands out aid while ignoring human rights records

Post-9/11 U.S. military aid and assistance had a huge impact in nations around the world — and at home.

About this investigation

For more than a year, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) conducted an investigation to assess the impact of foreign lobbying and terrorism on post-9/11 U.S. military training and assistance policies.

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Uzbekistan

A repugnant choice

In dealing with Uzbek dictator, U.S. buys access to air field — even after eviction.

Thai government’s cooperation in war on terror brought in U.S. dollars — and the CIA.

In the Philippines, U.S. aid has helped bolster a government whose military is tied to extrajudicial killings.

U.S. shows signs of emulating controversial Israeli anti-terrorism policy.

U.S. picked up tactics — including torture — from Israeli intelligence.

Collateral Damage

Renditions vs. rights

Jordan’s apparent willingness to participate in transfers of suspects trumps poor record on human rights.

Once-loyal Turkey passed up aid to maintain its own Iraq policy.

There are only a few hundred Muslim immigrants in Iaşi, a city of 350,000 that is Romania’s second-largest metropolis, and few of them seem eager to talk about what happened in January 2005. That’s when Romanian security forces converged on an Iaşi mosque and arrested five North African and Middle Eastern students enrolled at the local University of Medicine and Pharmacy on suspicion of being terrorists.

A tangled spy story has resulted in a major political and diplomatic embarrassment for the United States and its close ally in the war on terror, Italy.

After the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States, the CIA began using a tiny airfield north of Warsaw for transiting terrorist suspects to secret prisons and to countries known to employ torture.

One of the most significant fallouts from the U.S. war on terror has been the strain on America’s historically strong relationship with Europe.

Drug helps keep the government in business.

Some say lack of due process in kidnappings and detention at secret prisons amounts to war crimes.

Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, whose human rights records have long been described as “poor” or ones with “serious problems” by the U.S. State Department, have received millions in U.S. aid since the September 11, 2001, attacks.

Critics denounce ‘waterboarding’ and other interrogation techniques banned by Geneva Conventions.

One dramatic act sets Ethiopia apart from the array of countries with poor human rights records that have become United States counterterrorism allies since the September 11, 2001, attacks: With U.S. backing, it invaded a neighboring country and overthrew a Taliban-like Islamist movement.

There is no single, accepted definition of the terms “foreign aid” or even “foreign military aid” or “military assistance.” For a government…

For more than a year, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) conducted an investigation to assess the impact of foreign lobbying and terrorism on post-9/11 U.S. military training and assistance policies.

Collateral Damage

Profiteering on location

Djibouti’s repressive regime, not its people, has prospered since 9/11.

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